historic Joy Kogawa House

Shirley Bear, activist, visual artist, and elder, in conversation at Historic Joy Kogawa House

Join writer-in-residence Susan Crean for her conversation with Shirley Bear, activist, visual artist, and elder of the Maliseet First Nation. Shirley Bear’s writing includes an essay in the third volume of the anthology of writing from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission edited by Ashok Mathur. Two additional pieces are considered essential statements on her art and spiritual philosophy. The first is the opening piece in her book Virgin Bones (2006). The second is her curatorial statement accompanying the exhibition Changers: A Spiritual Renaissance (1989). In November 2011, Shirley Bear was inducted as a Member of the Order of Canada. She lives on the Tobique Reserve (Negootkook) in New Brunswick.

“Artists are the movers and changers of the world. They have always been revolutionaries, creating change in thought and style within their societies.”
—Shirley Bear, Changers: A Spiritual Renaissance, Curatorial Statement

Historic Joy Kogawa House, 1450 West 64th Avenue, Vancouver

Sunday, December 4, 2 to 4pm

Admission by donation.
Space is limited. To reserve a seat, email kogawahouse@yahoo.ca

Also, if you plan to attend, please find us on Facebook and Like this event.

Eric Enno Tamm in Conversation This Sunday

When: Sunday, October 16, 2 to 4pm
Where:Historic Joy Kogawa House, 1450 West 64th Avenue, Vancouver

Join author and adventurer Eric Enno Tamm in discussion about his latest book, The Horse That Leaps through Clouds: A Tale of Espionage, the Silk Road and the Rise of Modern China. He'll show photos from his research in China, during which he retraced the epic journey of a Russian spy who trekked from St. Petersburg to Beijing a century ago along the Silk Road. Books will be for sale and signing.

Space is limited. To reserve a seat, please RSVP kogawahouse@yahoo.ca.

Admission by donation. We acknowledge the financial support of the Canada Council Author Readings program. Eric Enno Tamm is an author, journalist and activist with more than 15 years’ experience in the media and non-profit sector. His first book, Beyond the Outer Shores: The Untold Story of Ed Ricketts, the Pioneering Ecologist Who Inspired John Steinbeck and Joseph Campbell, was a Kiriyama Prize Notable Book in 2005. His latest book, The Horse That Leaps Through Clouds: A Tale of Espionage, the Silk Road and the Rise of Modern China (Douglas & McIntyre, 2010), chronicles his epic journey retracing the route of a Russian spy who traveled the Silk Road a century ago. Born in Tofino and raised in Ucluelet, Eric currently lives in Ottawa where he continues to write and work on environmental issues.

Collage Button Making at Historic Joy Kogawa House

Please join community crafter Laura Bucci at Historic Joy Kogawa House to create collage buttons using text and a variety of other materials. Crafters of all levels are welcome to attend this FREE button-making workshop at Historic Joy Kogawa House, 1450 West 64th Avenue on Friday, September 23, from 7 to 9pm.

This event is part of a community celebration to welcome non-fiction writer Susan Crean as our 2011 writer-in-residence at Historic Joy Kogawa House. Susan Crean arrives from Toronto on September 15 to spend three months living and working in the former childhood home of Joy Kogawa. Members of the community will have the opportunity to meet Susan Crean during the workshop, and she will entertain crafters with daring tales of her plans as writer-in-residence, books will be available for sale and signing, and refreshments will be served. Buttons and collage materials will be provided free of charge but donations are appreciated!

For more information see www.laurabucci.com and Word on the Street.

Joy Remembers: A Vancouver Heritage Success Story

Time: 7pm to 9pm, Thursday, May 26
Where: Historic Joy Kogawa House, 1450 West 64th Ave, Vancouver
Who: Co-presented by the Heritage Vancouver Society and The Land Conservancy of BC
Admission: $75 TLC and Heritage Vancouver members; $100 non-members (tax receipt will be issued; this event is a fundraiser for renovations to expand the living-room of the house to make room for public events)
Ticket information: www.heritagevancouver.org

Event: Join Canadian author Joy Kogawa and heritage consultant Donald Luxton for an evening of story telling, and celebration of a significant Vancouver Heritage Success Story. This is a unique opportunity to experience Joy in conversation with Donald as she reminisces about her childhood memories of living at 1450 West 64th Avenue, Vancouver. Joy and Donald will also take you on guided tours of the house and garden and you will have the opportunity to discover The Land Conservancy’s restoration plans for the site. The event is a fundraiser in support of the restoration of the house and of Heritage Vancouver’s heritage conservation initiatives.

Background: The Historic Joy Kogawa House was featured on Heritage Vancouver’s 2005 Top Ten Endangered Sites at a time when demolition of the building seemed inevitable. Thanks to the efforts of The Land Conservancy of BC (TLC) and a grassroots organization of community activists, donations were received from more than 500 people across Canada and the house was purchased in 2006. The Kogawa House has special literary significance as the childhood home of acclaimed Canadian author Joy Kogawa, and now operates as a writer’s centre that regularly hosts literary events and an annual writer-in-residence program. The Land Conservancy is about to embark on restoration of this important Vancouver landmark house. It has been identified as one of Heritage Vancouver’s Success Stories.

Tickets available using PayPal at www.heritagevancouver.org.

Upcoming Events

This spring, Historic Joy Kogawa House will host a number of exciting events. Thanks for sharing this information with your friends, and for joining us on any or all of these occasions:

1. Mothers and Others Tea and Reading, 2 to 4pm, Saturday, May 7
2. Jumpstart Your Engines Poetry Workshop with Jericho Brown, 11am to 1pm, Sunday, May 15
3. Haiku Myths and Realities Workshop with Michael Dylan Welch, 1:30 to 5:30pm, Sunday, May 15
4. Joy Kogawa Remembers, 6 to 8pm, Thursday, May 26
5. Point of View Workshop with Zsuzsi Gartner, 10am to 3pm, Sunday, June 5

Mother’s Day Tea “On Mums and Our Other Mothers”
When: 2 to 4pm, Saturday, May 7
Where: Historic Joy Kogawa House, 1450 West 64th Avenue, Vancouver
Suggested Donation: $10 (includes tea and goodies)

Mother’s Day is a great time to celebrate your Mum. It’s also a great time to look back and think about all the women who have touched your life, almost like “other mothers.” Readings by Mette Bach, Shana Myara, Maddy Van Beek, Lorrie Miller, Cathleen With, and Fiona Tinwei Lam celebrate women supporting women. To reserve a space for you and your mum or other mother, email kogawahouse@yahoo.ca.

Jumpstart Your Engines Poetry Workshop with Jericho Brown
When: 11am to 1pm, Sunday, May 15
Where: Historic Joy Kogawa House, 1450 West 64th Avenue, Vancouver
Cost: $35

In the Jumpstart Your Engines Poetry Workshop, Jericho Brown helps students generate new work through a set of unconventional exercises that keep our ears open and our fingers moving. The workshop engenders new ideas about writing, and as there is a profound relationship between reading poetry and writing it, we participants read, discuss, and even recite the work of several poets whose examples might lead us to a further honing of our craft.

Jericho Brown worked as the speechwriter for the Mayor of New Orleans before receiving his PhD in Creative Writing and Literature from the University of Houston. The recipient of the Whiting Writers Award and fellowships from the Radcliffe Institute at Harvard University, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and the Krakow Poetry Seminar in Poland, Brown is an Assistant Professor at the University of San Diego. His poems have appeared in journals and anthologies, including 100 Best African American Poems. His first book, PLEASE (New Issues), won the American Book Award.

Jericho Brown will read from his work at the Cross-Border Pollination Reading Series on Saturday, May 14. Find out more at rachelrose.com.

To register for this workshop, email kogawahouse@yahoo.ca.


Haiku Myths and Realities Workshop with Michael Dylan Welch
When: 1:30 to 5:30pm, Sunday, May 15
Where: Historic Joy Kogawa House, 1450 West 64th Avenue, Vancouver
Cost: $45 or $20 for Vancouver Haiku Group members

haiku are easy
but sometimes they don’t make sense
refrigerator


Is this a haiku? Actually, no—not by a long shot. Yet many people think it is. Join Haiku Society of America Vice-President Michael Dylan Welch for an in-depth exploration of the myths and realities of haiku as a literary art, including key techniques such as kigo and kireji (season word and cutting word), objective sensory imagery, and more. You’ll learn a brief history of Japanese and English-language haiku, hear classic poems by Japanese masters, participate in writing exercises and critique, and receive copious handouts. Come learn the one thing the preceding poem gets right—and no, the 5-7-5 form isn’t one of them!

This hands-on workshop also explores how haiku techniques can help you improve your longer poetry or fiction. We’ll begin by discussing sample poems in English and build a list of characteristics we observe—these are the possible “targets” that haiku can aim for. We’ll also cover organizations and websites, and touch on related Japanese poetic forms, including senryu, haibun, haiga, renga/renku, and tanka. You’ll come away with an enlarged appreciation for the discipline and benefits of haiku writing, learn to make your haiku hit the target, and maybe even develop the haiku habit.

Michael Dylan Welch is vice-president of the Haiku Society of America and director of the Haiku North America conference (coming to Seattle, August 3–7, 2011). He’s published numerous poetry books, including anthologies and translations, and judged and won numerous haiku contests. He also founded NaHaiWriMo (National Haiku Writing Month). His website is graceguts.com.

Michael Dylan Welch will read from his work at the Cross-Border Pollination Reading Series on Saturday, May 14. Find out more at rachelrose.com.

To register for this workshop, email kogawahouse@yahoo.ca.


Joy Kogawa Remembers
When: 6 to 8pm, Thursday, May 26
Where: Historic Joy Kogawa House, 1450 West 64th Avenue, Vancouver
Cost: TBD

Joy Kogawa, in conversation with heritage architect Don Luxton, reminisces about her childhood memories of living at 1450 West 64th Avenue. This event is co-presented with Heritage Vancouver and TLC The Land Conservancy of BC, and is a fundraiser for renovations to the house. Find out more at email kogawahouse@yahoo.ca.


A Short-Story Writing Workshop with Zsuzsi Gartner
Inviting the Reader In and the Power of Point of View
When: 10am to 3pm, Sunday, June 5
Where: Historic Joy Kogawa House, 1450 West 64th Avenue, Vancouver
Cost: $135 (includes lunch)
To register, email kogawahouse@yahoo.ca.
Short fiction’s possibilities are delightful, startling and seemingly endless. Of the vital mechanics of the form (including structure, timeframe and tense choices, narrative momentum, dialogue, character) the single-most important choice you can make in writing short fiction is deciding on what point of view (or points of view) a story should be told from. Your POV choice (together with the more elusive quality of Voice) will dictate HOW you will write WHAT you want to write.

Beginning and emerging writers often adhere unconsciously to a particular POV ― what I call the default mode (and we all have one). During this workshop you’ll discover a multiplicity of POV choices and how a story can radically shift depending on who’s doing the telling or through whose eyes we’re witnessing things from. We’ll also look at The Writer’s Voice and talk about why finding your own voice as a writer is so important.

The second most important decision you need to make is deciding Where and How to begin your story. “Begin at the beginning and go on till you come to the end: then stop,” said the king in Alice in Wonderland. We’ll look at why it isn’t that simple when it comes to short fiction.

During this workshop you’ll do writing exercises, as well as read your work out loud and discuss your writing with the class. I will provide a mini course pack that we’ll use for examples and inspiration and that you are welcome to take home with you.

Zsuzsi Gartner is the author of the critically acclaimed story collection All the Anxious Girls on Earth (Key Porter), the just-published Better Living Through Plastic Explosives (April 2011, Hamish Hamilton / Penguin Canada), editor of the BC Book Prize–nominated Darwin’s Bastards: Astounding Tales from Tomorrow (Douglas & McIntyre), and the fiction editor of Vancouver Review.

Her fiction has been broadcast on CBC and widely anthologized, most recently in Best Canadian Stories: 2010. A new story appears in the May 2011 Walrus magazine.

She is on faculty this spring with the Banff Centre’s writing program and is an adjunct professor in creative writing at the University of British Columbia.

She lives in East Vancouver, with two men, one tall, one small.

To register, email kogawahouse@yahoo.ca.

International Women's Day event with Room Magazine

International Women's Day celebrates worldwide the economic, political, and social achievements of women past, present, and future.

March 8, 2011, will be the centennial celebration, and we're teaming up with Room Magazine, hosting a celebratory evening of readings to honour the fabulous women out there who make Room possible.

Join us at Historic Joy Kogawa House, 1450 West 64th Avenue, Vancouver, from 7pm–9:30pm, for light refreshments and readings by four contributors to Room--Chantal Gibson, Jane Silcott, Judy McFarlane, and Sigal Samuel.

Suggested entrance donations of $2 go to Joy Kogawa House's Writer-in-Residence Program. Space is limited. To secure yours, RSVP to news@roommagazine.com by Wednesday, March 2.

See you there!

Yarn Bombing the Joy Kogawa Cherry Tree


Help writing blossom at Historic Joy Kogawa House! Join Leanne Prain and Mandy Moore, co-authors of the book Yarn Bombing: The Art of Crochet and Knit Graffiti (Arsenal Pulp Press), as we cover the Joy Kogawa cherry tree in hundreds of knitted blossoms.

You are invited to come and knit or crochet pink cherry blossoms to help cover this historic tree, whose story is told in Joy Kogawa’s Naomi’s Tree, a picture book about friendship. Knitters and crocheters of all levels are welcome to attend these FREE events.

Join one of these two community knit-ins at the Historic Joy Kogawa House, 1450 West 64th Avenue, Vancouver, on:

Saturday, February 5, 2 to 3:30pm

Or help to stitch all of the cherry blossoms into place at Historic Joy Kogawa House on:

Sunday, March 6, 2 to 3:30pm

Leanne and Mandy will entertain stitchers with daring tales of yarn bombing feats from around the world, books will be available for sale and signing, and refreshments will be served. Yarn and needles will be provided; however, donations of pink yarn are appreciated!

Can’t make it to the event? Mail in your knitted or crocheted cherry blossoms to be added to the tree, as follows:

Historic Joy Kogawa House
1450 West 64th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C. V6P 2N4

Or drop your blossoms in the covered bin you’ll find just down the steps from the sidewalk in front of the house at 1450 West 64th Avenue. Submissions will be accepted up until March 1, 2011. All cherry blossoms should be made out of pink yarn. Patterns to use are available here.

For more information see our Facebook page or visit www.yarnbombing.com

Chanting Denied Shores: The Komagata Maru Narratives book launch and author event

Sunday, January 16, 2:30 to 4:30pm

Please join member of parliament Ujjal Dosanjh and author Tariq Malik for the launch of Chanting Denied Shores, a historical novel spanning seven years (1914 – 1921) in the lives of four protagonists of the Komagata Maru debacle. Upon the ship’s arrival in the Burrard Inlet of Vancouver’s racially charged harbour, it is intercepted by hostile immigration authorities. Yet the passengers are determined to forge a foothold in the Dominion of Canada.

The novel follows four main characters: fugitive Punjabi schoolteacher Bashir Ali Lopoke, who is escaping his past as a revolutionary firebrand; the conflicted Canadian Immigration Inspector William Hopkinson, who is of Anglo-Indian descent; Mewa Singh, a disgruntled Vancouver farmhand who is witnessing his people’s daily humiliation; and Jean Fryer, Hopkinson’s seven-year daughter, whose recollections shed fresh light on the unfolding traumatic events.

Through these fractured personal narratives we witness the emerging challenge on the American shores of the Indian revolutionary movement and the humiliation of the passengers on board the Komagata Maru.

Please join us for this author event and book signing.

Space is limited. To assure a seat, please RSVP to kogawahouse@yahoo.ca.

Yarn Bombing at Historic Joy Kogawa House


Help writing blossom at Historic Joy Kogawa House! Join Leanne Prain and Mandy Moore, co-authors of the book Yarn Bombing: The Art of Crochet and Knit Graffiti (Arsenal Pulp Press), as we cover the Joy Kogawa cherry tree in hundreds of knitted blossoms.

You are invited to come and knit or crochet pink cherry blossoms to help cover this historic tree, whose story is told in Joy Kogawa’s Naomi’s Tree, a picture book about friendship. Knitters and crocheters of all levels are welcome to attend these FREE events.

Join one of these two community knit-ins at the Historic Joy Kogawa House, 1450 West 64th Avenue, Vancouver, on:

Sunday, January 23, 2 to 3:30pm
Saturday, February 5, 2 to 3:30pm


Or help to stitch all of the cherry blossoms into place at Historic Joy Kogawa House on:

Sunday, March 6, 2 to 3:30pm

Leanne and Mandy will entertain stitchers with daring tales of yarn bombing feats from around the world, books will be available for sale and signing, and refreshments will be served. Yarn and needles will be provided; however, donations of pink yarn are appreciated!

Can’t make it to the event? Mail in your knitted or crocheted cherry blossoms to be added to the tree, as follows:

Historic Joy Kogawa House
1450 West 64th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C. V6P 2N4

Or drop your blossoms in the covered bin you’ll find just down the steps from the sidewalk in front of the house at 1450 West 64th Avenue. Submissions will be accepted up until March 1, 2011. All cherry blossoms should be made out of pink yarn. Patterns to use are available here.

For more information see our Facebook page or visit www.yarnbombing.com

Ryukoku Sogo Gakuen

 

Ryukoku students visit Kogawa House in July 2007
 

Ryukoku students visit Kogawa House in July 2007

Ryukoku Summer Students Visit Kogawa House 

 

A group of 19 enthusiastic Japanese high school students and their teachers visited historic Joy Kogawa House early on the morning of Thursday, July 26, 2007. Members of the group attend school in various parts of Japan and came together in Vancouver to participate in Ryukoku Sogo Gakuen, a three-week educational program out of Steveston Buddhist Temple that promotes religious, cultural, and international understanding. The Ryukoku Summer English program has been in operation every summer for the past five years.

 

This year, an important aspect of the curriculum was to create some understanding and appreciation of the Japanese experience in British Columbia. As part of their preparation for their visit to Canada, students were required to read Joy Kogawa’s story of the internment, Naomi’s Road, as well as do some research about the author. The culmination of their learning was the exciting tour of the author’s childhood home during their visit to Vancouver.

 

Tamsin Baker, regional manager of The Land Conservancy of BC’s Lower Mainland office, was present at the house to welcome the group. Tamsin showed the students photos of the house during various times in the past and explained the history of the house and plans for its future. The highlight of the morning came when Joy herself arrived at the house, accompanied by David Kogawa and their son, Gordon. Her arrival was a completely unexpected surprise. The students and teachers were absolutely thrilled to meet Joy in person and gave her a very enthusiastic welcome. Everyone wanted to have a picture taken with Joy.

 

The Ryukoku School wishes to thank Joy Kogawa, David Kogawa, and Tamsin Baker for taking the time to make their visit to the house very meaningful and for helping to create wonderful memories for the students to take back to Japan.

 

—Posted on behalf of Joan Young

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